If you think you or someone you live with has Coronavirus

What should I do if I think I have the symptoms of, or have had, close contact with someone who has had, COVID-19?

For the latest information on symptoms, what you should do and how long you should self-isolate, see the “staying at home information” from the NHS.

A change to the self-isolation period from 14 to 10 days was announced on 11 December – read more here

If I have to self-isolate, will I be paid?

If you can’t work while you are self-isolating because  of  COVID-19, statutory sick pay (SSP) is now available from the first day you are off sick.  If you are self- isolating but you are not sick, you may be expected to work from home, on full pay.

Speak to the Branch if you are concerned your employer is not following the guidance.

Please note that if you are required to self-isolate because you have returned to the UK from a country which does not have exemption from government restrictions on non-essential travel, the rules are different. Whether you are paid or get sick pay will depend on your contract.

Speak to the Branch if you need help to understand what pay you are entitled to.

If you live with someone who has symptoms of coronavirus, you can get an isolation note to send to your employer as proof you need to stay off work. You do not need to get a note from a GP.

Get an isolation note

If you are paid less than £120 a week you will be able to access Universal Credit or Contributory Employment and Support Allowance more easily.

If you’re on a zero-hours contract you are not entitled to statutory sick pay unless you can demonstrate that you earn at least £120 per week from your employer.

We’re urging the government to help those on zero-hours contracts.

If you get contractual sick pay (a rate agreed by your employer), it’s good practice to ensure that such absence is not counted towards any sickness absence policy triggers points.

This has been agreed for NHS staff and the majority of local government staff (ie those covered by national joint council (NJC) terms and conditions and the Scottish Joint Council).